tips for taking winter photos

Tourist at Gerainger National Park, Norway. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt / Photo TravelingMom

Taking pictures in winter elements of snow, ice, and rain can be challenging, but worth the effort. Whether you are skiing in the mountains or flying across the country, these tips for taking winter photos will help you get better results shooting in snow, white backgrounds and bright light, no matter what kind of camera (or phone) you are using.

Himalayas by air, Nepal. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt

Himalayas by air, Nepal. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt

Give Your Winter Photos Some Perspective

White snowy mountainscapes are beautiful and breathtaking, whether seen from a valley below, or a plane above.

But photos don’t really do justice to what our eyes see, and when we look at them later, we might not recognize where we took it, or even, remember why.

Do you want your snowy mountain photo to tell a story? Put someone or something in the foreground of the frame.

Snowy Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt

Snowy Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt

Give Your Winter Photos Some Context

Adding and image to the foreground is also important to give context. Where are you when you take the picture?

Would you ever imagine this snowy mountain is in Morocco without the foreground?

Give Your Winter Photos Some Texture

When you have white cloudy skies and snow, then be sure to add some texture. In this Instagram shot, the bare trees give depth and dimension – without the trees in the frame to break up the white, the photo would fall flat.

Husky Kiss, Juneau, Alaska. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt

Husky Kiss, Juneau, Alaska. Photo credit: Kymri Wilt

Adjust Your Focus for Better Winter Photos

For best exposure, make sure you focus on the subject and not the snow.

Now this can be tricky, but that means bending the “rules.” Use a flash. Contrary to what you might think, the brighter the light conditions, the more necessary a flash becomes.

Even without flash, Instagram makes it easier to correct poor exposure by offering adjustment tools – try sliding the “shadows” control to bring out your subject’s face.

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And speaking of bright and sunny, if the sun is out, don’t be afraid to include it directly in your camera phone shot. It can have a dramatic wintery effect without the need for filters.

Glacial peaks and blue sky of Geiranger #norway #unesco #nature #landscape #norwayourway #clouds

A photo posted by Kymri / Mira Terra Images (@kymri) on

Show us your best winter travel shots by adding the hashtag #TMOM when you share them on Twitter and Instagram. We’ll share our favorites!