2006

When unexpected travel pops up, life turns upside down.  The rest of my family handles the blip in the routine much better than I do.  On a Monday, I had to fly to Cleveland for my uncle’s funeral, which added up to only one additional night away from home.  However, when you include the extra two days away and the fact that I got home right at bedtime and then tack all that on to my usual overnight work trip, it felt like a lot longer.

To top it off, we had recently welcomed a new au pair into our household, and I was unsure of her ability to supervise three kids.  What I had seen of her personality so far convinced me that my 9-year-old would be running things (and staying up waaay late).  My mother-in-law alleviated my worries by cooking dinner and babysitting the babysitter.  

I just couldn’t wait till Friday; I even looked forward to the possible mess and piles of laundry.  I just wanted to be home.  Doing dishes and general cleaning up actually appealed to me.  I needed a tactile way of connecting with my home and my family.

Missing work was an option, absolutely; and I’m still not sure why, other than money, I didn’t choose it.  My co-workers would have definitely understood.  I had meetings that could have been rescheduled and deadlines that could have been pushed but I chose to go to work anyway.  Nothing major happened while I was at work; I just felt out of sorts and disconnected.  I missed my family intensely and I am not sure I made the right decision by going to work.  Maybe that is the bottom line — that I won’t always make the right decision.