The newly designed Panasonic home surveillance system with modular parts serves a very different purpose in the homes of anxious neighbors expecting intruders versus calm, confident, traveling families.

 Seeking Nature, Not Burglars, with Panasonic Home Surveillance System

Will the Panasonic surveillance system help a backyard gardener? Photo by Christine Tibbetts, Blended Family TravelingMom

Will the Panasonic surveillance system help a backyard gardener? Photo by Christine Tibbetts, Blended Family TravelingMom

Burglars are anticipated any moment by my neighbors to the east and west. It’s a fear based on nothing I can see or ever heard in my bucolic neighborhood.

They’d never choose to travel as often as my multi-generational family does.

When I tell them about the Panasonic Home Surveillance System I’m testing, they’ll want two.

My notion of value added regarding surveillance is outer galactic compared to theirs fearing robberies.

They lock and bolt the doors to walk to the mailbox.

Watch garden, take trip

Here are three ways I am applying the easy set up and expandable features of what Panasonic calls the KX-HN6002 home network system.

The number 600 within the code means outdoor cameras and 200 indicates “use inside.”

  1. Foiling the bunnies. Baby bunnies and full-grown rabbits slip out of the woods behind my yard when I’m off on a road trip, not watching the crops, and dine on my edible landscape. Beans, Brussels sprouts and cabbage seem to be their favorite.

            I might do better setting rabbit-friendly cages if my camera shows me which direction they come and go. Then I can help them live somewhere else.

My husband would eat the rabbits but I am not so inclined. His father taught him to hunt; mine was more inclined to dinner in Manhattan.

  1. Feeding the trout. Something is knocking my fish feeder off its hanging arm and I need to know if my enemy is two-legged or four. Raccoons are hard to prevent along a wooded stream in the north Georgia mountains, but prankster people might be persuaded to stop. Putting the camera in place here requires taking it with me on a five-hour drive, generally scooping up grandchildren en route..
  2. Fearing the fox. Chickens are taking up residence in lots of urban backyards and it’s true around the corner from my house on our son’s 14 acres. When I’m satisfied with my rabbit watching, the home surveillance system goes to the henhouse to keep an eye on the prowling fox.

Hawks swoop down too for chicken dinners but even this high-tech camera isn’t likely to follow their patterns gliding on the thermals. So glad my travels in central Florida offered up the opportunity to soar in a glider.

Night vision camera

The Panasonic surveillance cameras come in nighttime versions and that’s what I’m using for critter control.

Testing spaces for Panasonic home surveillance in the garden. Photo by Christine Tibbetts, Blended Family TravelingMom

Testing spaces for Panasonic home surveillance in the garden. Photo by Christine Tibbetts, Blended Family TravelingMom

With 1,000 feet the range from the system’s hub, and Wi-Fi all I need for what Panasonic calls its DECT program – Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications – I should gather some tracking clues.

Wonder if the Panasonic design teams might tell me if they had the natural world in mind as much as the locked-tight, double-bolted doors of my neighbors? Are my uses what they had in mind when they provided the system for me to review?

With the purchase price of $299 and no monthly usage fee to budget, I’m comfortable experimenting with this system.

For instance, installation instructions say people approaching directly in front of the camera, as on a narrow walkway, are difficult to detect. Not a problem with skittery rabbits or sly foxes.

The neighbors would have to read that part of enclosed info. They leave so many lights on all night they’d do better without the infrared that I prefer.

Infrared or bright lights?

Infrared sensors don’t work so well facing a road because passing cars could give false heat reading. No problem there for my trout stream intention.

I can add cameras up to a maximum of four, knowing microphone and speakers are in the camera. That’s good for families with babies and teenagers, and children old enough to let themselves in to an empty house after school.

Here’s how Marathon TravelingMom uses her surveillance system for careful parenting.

No dogs at my house any more but I imagine people with pets home alone and lonely while everyone is at work and school might have stories about speaking to Fido via the camera.

Deer eat strawberries when family travels. Catch on camera? Photo by Christine Tibbetts, Blended Family TravelingMom

Deer eat strawberries when family travels. Catch on camera? Photo by Christine Tibbetts, Blended Family TravelingMom

I have already downloaded the free Panasonic image app so I should be ready. Running remote thermostats used to feel daunting but now is old hat, so this ought to work intuitively too.

My eldercare responsibility years are over, so I’m in the queue for the receiving end. Admiring the way parents are using this home network system for loving and protecting their kids makes me wonder how graciously I’ll accept cameras looking at me?

Might be so routine by then that it won’t be an issue and I can stay at home longer.

I’d like to hear how you consider directing surveillance cameras to good use.