3Books

Images courtesy of W.W. Norton & Co., Inc., Univ. Press of New England & Stewart Tabori & Chang

Before you head to New England, stop by your local library and check out these three books – particularly if you want more from your trip than the ordinary tourist spots.

Curious New England: The Unconventional Traveler’s Guide to Eccentric Destinations by Joseph A. Citro and Diane E. Foulds

For travelers seeking an out-of-the-ordinary experience – either as a day trip or punctuating a weekend getaway – this 2004 book is a good resource. It shares a variety of unusual places across New England from the mysterious America’s Stonehenge in North Salem, New Hampshire, to the Douglass Monument in Ashford, Connecticut. It’s worth checking out of the library. However, be sure to do a quick Internet search on the places that interest you most – some are no longer open to the public, so that little bit of research can help you avoid disappointment and a wasted trip.

A Visitor’s Guide to Colonial & Revolutionary New England by Patricia and Robert Foulke

New England is an area steeped in rich history. From the earliest settlers of America to the birthplace of the Revolution, the New England states are home to historic sites, museums and many reenactments of historic moments. If this is what you and your kids are into, then A Visitor’s Guide to Colonial & Revolutionary New England is a must-read. It focuses completely on the things history buffs want to see most.

The Smithsonian Guide to Historic America: Northern New England by Vance Muse

A great companion book to A Visitor’s Guide to Colonial & Revolutionary New England is The Smithsonian Guide to Historic America: Northern New England. It’s packed with historic context that brings any history lover’s trip to life with facts and details you won’t find in any ordinary guidebook. Read passages together with your kids before you go to get them excited about the old but extraordinary places you’ll be visiting.