Michigan Science Center in Detroit

Photo credit: Teresa Shaw / Working TravelingMom

The Michigan Science Center is more than just a fun place for the kids – it’s an opportunity to teach them science concepts in an interactive and, yes, fun way.

Located in Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, the museum has three floors of kid-friendly exhibits and shows that help kids young and not-so-young to engage and participate. DisclosureTMOM

 

 

 

 

 

Hands-On Education about Health and Nutrition

Hands-On Education about Health and Nutrition

Photo credit: Teresa Shaw / Working TravelingMom

The Health and Nutrition gallery teaches kids about calories intake and how much exercise it takes to burn off certain foods. My kids enjoyed the Start Working it Off! exhibit, where they could climb a step machine, ride a bike or propel a wheelchair while watching a counter that calculated how many calories they had burned. Signs posted in the exhibit showed how many calories it takes to burn off a piece of broccoli or a cheeseburger, so the kids could see the difference between the “healthy” and “not-so-healthy” foods.

Detroit and Michigan History Abounds

There are also plenty of nods toward Michigan and Detroit history. An Engineering gallery with a Fun Factory manufacturing area, where the kids could operate the control for a vacuum lifter, put together gears on a moving assembly line, and try on various types of protective gear that workers need to wear to stay safe on their jobs. My kids loved running across the Mini Mac Bridge, an 80-foot-long pedestrian bridge modeled after the Mackinac Bridge, which connects the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of Michigan.

Michigan Science Center Math Mountain

Photo credit: Teresa Shaw / Working TravelingMom

Learning Around Every Corner

But the science wasn’t limited to just the galleries and exhibits – even just a walk to the restroom provides a learning opportunity. The Math Mountain painted on the floor allows kids to do math with their feet on a hopscotch-like format. The Giant Pendulum, found at the bottom of the stairs on the lower level, knocks down marbles as the Earth makes its rotation – eventually making a full rotation after about 30 hours.

For more information, visit the Michigan Science Center website.