Sturdy shoes for walking and a good camera are necessities. A step counter is optional but worth it to have. And a love for history and culture are most welcome. Segovia, Spain is the home of two World Heritage Sites, and there are no less than three iconic places that you have to see while visiting this historic city northwest of Madrid.  We visited Segovia as a family of five, and we touched a structure from antiquity, made a connection with Walt Disney, and connected a little more with the history of Spain!

Segovia Spain

A walk through the streets of Segovia.
Photo credit: Dominique Dean, daughter of Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

3 Must-See Places to Visit in Segovia, Spain!

One day is all it takes to have a full-experience in beautiful Segovia, Spain. This city is a popular day trip destination from Madrid, and it is also easy to get to from neighboring Salamanca. Walking is a perfect way to explore the city, which is packed with much to see. We arrived by bus from Salamanca, found the Tourism Center, and acquired a map. We were able to see the layout of the city and decided where we wanted to go. Our goal was to visit three of Segovia’s well-known attractions: the Aqueduct of Segovia, the Segovia Cathedral, and the Alcazar of Segovia. In the hustle and bustle of this city full of tourists, we made our way to the first site on our list, which is surrounded by the Tourism Center itself.

Segovia Spain

We were in awe of this aqueduct that dates back to the 2nd century AD.
Photo credit: Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

An ancient Roman Aqueduct

Rising almost 95 feet from the ground at its tallest point, The Aqueduct is one of the most well-preserved structures found in Spain. It is a two-tiered monument, it is massive, and it is quite impressive to see up close. The Aqueduct is roughly two millennia in age, and fascinatingly enough, it is held together with absolutely no mortar!

This was, by far, the site that my husband Art wanted to experience the most. He is a history buff by nature, and he was just in awe of the size and amazing condition of this historical feature. Art, our son, and our eldest daughter took the opportunity to climb the steps to the top of the Aqueduct to get another view (our youngest and I stayed on the street level – not lovers of heights). It made such an impression on my husband that he later purchased a replica of it to keep on his desk at work. We took a brief lunch break to refuel and recharge before our next stop: the Segovia Cathedral.

The Cathedral of Segovia

This massive cathedral dates back to the mid-1500s, and is one of the last Gothic cathedrals in Spain and Europe. Although it was built in the Renaissance era, the style is Gothic because it replaced a cathedral in the area that previously had been destroyed. In addition, it sits as a major feature of the Plaza Mayor, and occupies the spot where Isabella I was proclaimed Queen of Castile.

Segovia Spain

The Segovia Cathedral is impressive, and the last Gothic cathedral built in Spain.
Photo credit: Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

There is a small fee of 3 euros per person to enter and look around, and we took about 45 minutes to do so on a self-guided tour. The interior is expansive and magnificent. We explored three large naves and several chapels, and the stained-glass windows that we look up and saw were captivating. We also viewed several  paintings and designs of Biblical scenes carved into the edifice itself. {We don’t have any photos of those particular items because photography of those is prohibited. Nevertheless, they were amazing and inspired a quiet reverence and respect.}

Segovia Spain

Stained glass windows are beautiful to behold all around the Cathedral.
Photo credit: Dominique Dean, daughter of Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

 

The interior space of the Cathedral Photo credit: Dominique Dean, daughter of Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

The interior space of the Cathedral
Photo credit: Dominique Dean, daughter of Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

The Alcazar of Segovia

Our last stop was the Alcàzar of Segovia, the Castle. The Alcàzar has been in existence since at least 1120, when the first mention of it is known. In its time, it has been a fortress, a royal palace, and a state prison, just to name a few. Currently, it is a museum and a military historical archive. Incidentally, for all the Disney fans, this castle was one of Walt Disney’s inspirations for the Cinderella castle in Walt Disney World!

There are about 12 rooms that are open to the public, and it took us about an hour or so to tour on our own. We were taken back in time to a different age as we viewed the Throne room, complete with custom crafted thrones for the King and Queen. Several pieces of wonderfully preserved medieval armor and weaponry are housed in the Armory. Once we wrapped up our tour, we made a stop by the gift store, which offered everything from souvenir mints to books about the history of the royalty of Spain.

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The Segovia Castle is the inspiration for a beloved icon in the United States.
Photo credit: Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

 

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Such rich colors and majesty in the Throne Room!
Photo credit: Dominique Dean, daughter of Denedriane Dean/Serendipity TravelingMom

In total, we spent from 12 PM  – 6 PM exploring these wondrous places in this amazing city.  We logged about six miles of walking from the start of the day until we boarded the bus to leave. (Needless to say, we were some tired puppies.) Our whole family enjoyed the sights, and we are so glad that we made a day-trip to Segovia. Each one of us were amazed that we could touch edifices from the times of antiquity, giving us yet another way to connect with the rich history of Spain!